The Great Debate – One CTA vs Multiple for Landing Pages

This argument has brought out the good, the bad, and the ugly in marketers and product teams.

On one side, you have the landing page with one form, one call-to-action (CTA) that funnels leads down a direct path of completion. On the other side, you have the landing page that offers multiple paths or CTAs that have the user deciding on where they want to go and what they want to do.

So which one’s right?

Let’s take a closer look at the reasoning behind each type of landing page before we decide.

A Breakdown of the CTA Argument

One CTA

By having only one path for the user like a form fill, you are offering a more direct approach. You are telling the lead the exact next step they need to take when they land there.

There are many benefits and negatives to this approach:

PositiveNegatives
More ControlHigher Bounce Rate
Less Confusion for the LeadConstant Need to Test CTA
Capture a Specific Goal 
Easy Measurable Results 
Able to Nurture Leads 

Multiple CTAs

The more links you have on the landing page, the more options you give for a user to leave your landing page. As you give more freedom for your user to decide on their own path, you run risks of never being able to attain their contact information.

Here are the benefits and disadvantages to this approach:

PositiveNegatives
Gives More Options to UserLess Control
Lower Bounce RateHard to Track Landing Page Performance
 Less Conversions
 Unable to Nurture Leads
 May Never Get Contact Info

So Who Wins?

It honestly depends on your goals for which type of landing page will work best for you. For instance, when we ran a landing page test for our client who wanted to lower his bounce rate on the landing page (he was convinced that it would save cost), we tested a main navigation landing page that lessened the bounce rate, but also the conversion rate (4%).

We made a recommendation to move back to the original landing page (7%) to best capture the leads’ information and then established robust email marketing campaigns that sent the user more information on areas of the main navigation, like How it Works, the Benefits, and how to sign-up for an account.

 

Based off this past experience and testing others, we’re strong believers in the One CTA landing page as it gives our clients the best chance at gathering a contact’s information and being able to build their databases.

Do you agree or disagree?

Leave us a comment below! We’d love to hear from you.